The Lotus Eaters – Barbara Wildenboer

I worked on this exhibition at the end of last year. The works speak of natural resources and, of course, water specifically. Wildenboer is a gifted artist with fresh interpretations on a subject we tend to forget. Her incorporation of The Odyssey by Homer is both smart and lends to the exhibit a sense of romanticism. Enjoy the shots!

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The boat filled with rocks makes a beautiful metaphor for the human race’s treatment of our resources and “Penelope’s Web” at the back is well-placed to fill in the air and also remind us that water is all around!

This work in particular was beautiful to see when there  was a slight breeze or when someone opens the door too quickly.

This work in particular was beautiful to see when there was a slight breeze or when someone opens the door too quickly.

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Beautiful lotus leaves made  from laser-cut maps.

Beautiful lotus leaves made from laser-cut maps.

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Each panel was shot at a different time of day, hence the beautiful palate.

Each panel was shot at a different time of day, hence the beautiful palate.

2000 boats folded from pages of The Odyssey. (Folding that amount, of course, affords you a wish)

2000 boats folded from pages of The Odyssey. (Folding that amount, of course, affords you a wish)

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Playing it safe

My first entry for the Swedish Innovation Photography Competition.

My first entry for the Swedish Innovation Photography Competition. The competition calls for the use of a Swedish innovation to be used in a South African context. I worked with safety matches. Referencing sayings surrounding the idea of “playing with matches” and the concept of the “safety” match in the hands of a child. “Playing it safe” by Kevin du Plessis.

Looking to see in colour

By Kevin du Plessis, mixed medium on 100 % cotton artist’s paper.

Synopsis:

I’ve been working on a series called ‘Colour Blind’ inspired by a sociology class I interpreted earlier this year. “I am colour blind,” a young student said, “everyone is the same to me.” I immediately recognised this argument from various other cultural debates and formed the opinion that such a notion does not resonate with our multi-cultural nation. ‘Colour Blind’ focuses on 8 different people’s ‘racial history’, so to speak, depicting their backgrounds in ink illustrations while the artwork shows only one colour, skin colour.

Flowing from this on going project comes ‘Looking to see in colour’. This work explores the continuing need for South Africans to engage socially and otherwise with different cultures, albeit a difficult process met with discomfort, and even disapproval.

The title encompasses what the work is about: looking, seeing, and colour. Dealing with perceptions and projections, and a personal struggle in learning to be comfortable in situations that ought not to be uncomfortable, the work looks to engage the observer into its own observations. As I started travelling into the bowels of Johannesburg I realised that I was being watched and that I was also looking back. I caught some of those expressions and relayed them as I saw them looking, while I was trying to see, in this work. ‘Looking to see in colour’ is meant to present an open seat to whomever is willing to sit.

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